Just who can you claim as a dependent on your taxes?

Taxes: Dependents



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Claim my son as a dependent if he filed taxes?

Bankrate

Even though you are allowed to claim your son as a dependent on your tax return, he may have been required to file his own return in order to receive a refund of taxes he paid on that part-time job he worked while going to school.

Child-related tax breaks growth chart

Bankrate

Kids grow up so quickly. That's why parents keep track of their progress with those colorful wall charts. But in addition to noting the ever-escalating inches, moms and dads need to pay attention to their children's ages. Just how old Janie and Jimmy are affects tax benefits that parents can claim. This tax growth chart can help you trace the tax breaks that depend on a child's age.

Claim My 19-Year-Old Qualifying Dependent?

Bankrate

Your son is considered a qualifying dependent. He is 19 and goes to college. He earned about $1,800 this summer, and he receives scholarship money. Can you still claim him as a dependent? The answer is yes, you can claim your son as a dependent on your tax return. Your son does not need to file a tax return, as his income was not more than $5,950.

Properly Defined Dependents Can Pay Off

Bankrate

Your son is off at college. Can you still claim him as a dependent? The answer for most parents is "yes." But, as is often the case with tax questions, determining who can be claimed as a dependent is not always a clear-cut exercise. Dependent claims aren't limited to children. An adult relative could qualify as a taxpayer's dependent as long as he or she meets certain Internal Revenue Service conditions.

Tax Help in Caring for an Aging Parent

Bankrate

Millions of adult children find themselves looking after aging parents. Tax laws offer some help, as long as you and your folks meet the criteria. The key to Internal Revenue Service assistance in caring for an elderly relative is whether you can claim the person as a dependent. Any dependent must meet certain tests. While there is a little flexibility when dealing with children, fewer exceptions are granted when the potential dependent is older.

Is 19-Year-Old Still a Dependent?

Bankrate

"I have a son who is 19 and has lived with me for nine months of the year and is not a student. I have provided more than half of his support. He was employed for two months over the summer, making less than $2,600 for the year. Can I still claim him as a dependent? If so, do I put his income down under mine or does it even need to be claimed, or does he have to file a tax return?"

IRS Suspicious of Dependency Exemptions

Bankrate

"I filed my nephew and my stepdaughter as dependency exemptions. I know the Internal Revenue Service wants me to show proof of these dependents. The person I spoke with told me I didn't have a right to claim these two kids. Actually, she was very rude. I took care of my nephew over half of the year and my stepdaughter all of last year. How can I prove my relationship to them?"

Getting Dependent Tax Exemption for Brother

Bankrate

"My brother moved in with me when he lost his job two years ago. His unemployment has run out, and in 2012, I have provided all his living expenses. I would claim him as a dependent relative, but I want to make sure that doing so will not obligate me to pay his outstanding bills -- including a very steep tax bill that he currently cannot pay. If I claim a dependent tax exemption on my taxes, am I signing on to pay his outstanding tax bills?"

Can I Claim 24-year-old Son as Dependent?

Bankrate

"My son turned 24 last year. Since he is a full-time college student, can I claim him as a dependent? He had income from a part-time job, but I was his main source of income. Is he a qualifying child? Or at least a qualifying relative?"


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